Paraeducator Training Materials

Advanced Skills Of Specialists In Employment Training (ASSET)

Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, Utah State University, 1996; 6 VHS tapes, 375 pp. Instructors manual, and 4 copies of 320-page specialistâs workbook ($375)

Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-2865; (801) 797-2329

A comprehensive, competency-based training program for entry-level supported employment specialists. Includes a manual for instructors, a workbook for specialists, and video material showing community jobs. The program can be delivered in brief workshops, a series of intense instructional sessions, or college courses. It emphasizes advancement of practical skills with exercises for specialists to apply procedures in work settings. Unit 1: Introduction to Supported Employment; Unit 2: Job Marketing and Development; Unit 3: Assessment Procedures; Unit 4: Job-Based Instructional Procedures; Unit 5: Behavioral Intervention Procedures. www.trisped.org/asset

Before The Bell Rings: What Every Paraeducator Should Know

Agency for Instructional Technology, Customer Service Department, Box A, Bloomington, IN 47402-0210; 1996; 6-part video and facilitators guide ($295); 1-800-457-4509

A video and print workshop resource to prepare education teams to implement ongoing professional development programs for paraeducators in pre-school, elementary, and secondary education. Train paraeducators to communicate more effectively with teachers, administrators, parents, and students. Define the roles and responsibilities of paraeducators, especially in relation to the education team. Develop paraeducators problem-solving and behavior management techniques. Prepare paraeducators to actively practice your districtâs professional and ethical standards of conduct. Guide includes workshop agendas, overhead masters, follow-up activities to each part of video, and listings of additional resources.

Beyond The Sandbox: Teaching Assistants In Early Childhood Education

Indiana Preschool Initiative, Center for Innovative Practices for Young Children, Institute for the Study of Developmental Disabilities and the Indiana Department of Education, Division of Special Education

ISDD, Attn: CeDIR, 2853 E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47408-2601 or fax to (812) 855-9630; $25 plus $3.75 shipping and handling

Videotape demonstrates the valuable role of teaching assistants; initiates dialogue about specific situations covered in video; helps administrators understand the changing role of teaching assistants; helps parents better understand the importance of teaching assistants and their link between family, teacher, and child.

Bilingual Special Education Training Of Trainers Institute

Bueno Center For Multicultural Education, Campus Box 249, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0249

Training Modules include: Cultural Pluralism and Exceptionality, Cross-cultural Language Acquisition and Communication, Second Language Acquisition, Communication and Learning, Collaboration in the Mainstream, Classroom Management and Curriculum Development, Cognitive Learning Styles and Strategies, and Adapting Instruction for Diverse Learners.

Crossroads Cafe: An Esol Program For Adult Leanrers

Formative Evaluation Study

Seymour Spiegel, Project Director, and Irene C. Rayman, Evaluation Analyst; CASE Report #01-97

Center for Advanced Study in Education, 365 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3300, New York, NY 10016; 36 pp.; 1997

Findings of a formative evaluation of Crossroads Cafe, an ESOL Adult Learning Program, a distance learning adult level video program designed to teach English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). The research focused on how 22 programs were implemented in 6 different regions of New York State- what worked, what didn't, and why. The program is designed to teach English to adult learners working independently without an instructor present. It is targeted to individuals who are literate in their native language and who have some proficiency in writing and speaking English. The main component of the learning program is a series of 26 half-hour episodes about six ethnically diverse characters whose lives intersect at Crossroads Cafe, a neighborhood restaurant. Collateral work units support the videos with exercises designed to develop story comprehension, language skills, and higher order thinking. Two resource books are also available to teachers. A Partner Guide offers suggestions and reproducible masters for an English proficient non-professional friend and family member who can guide the learner in his or her study of English.

Early Childhood: The Role Of The Paraprofessional

Module Five. Facilitator's Edition [and] Student's Edition. Strategies for Paraprofessionals Who Support Individuals with Disabilities Series

Rush, Karen

Hutchinson Technical Coll., MN; Minnesota State Board of Technical Colleges, St. Paul; Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Institute on Community Integration, 1995, 347 pp.

University of Minnesota, The Institute on Community Integration (UAP), 150 Pillsbury Drive, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($25 facilitator edition; $15 student edition)

The fifth in a series of federally supported modules for training paraprofessional school personnel who work with students with disabilities, this module focuses on early childhood education needs of children with disabilities. Both a facilitator's edition and a student's edition are provided. Chapter 1 presents material on fundamentals and legal foundations of early intervention and the roles and responsibilities of paraprofessionals. Chapter 2 describes the basic principles of child development and developmental domains. Individualized Education Plans, the assessment of the child and family, and development of instructional goals and objectives are discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the classroom, with information on appropriate practices, instructional techniques, and monitoring progress. The needs of families are evaluated in Chapter 5, which examines working with families, the development of cross-cultural competence, community integration, and the paraprofessional's role. Seven appendices include: a handout on accessible child care, a listing of model learner outcomes, a sample Individualized Education Plan form, an Individualized Family Service Plan form, articles on behavior management, a play checklist, and a family needs survey. The facilitator's edition offers learning activities and information sheets to be used as transparencies. (Contains 22 references.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED398698

A Core Curriculum &Amp; Training Program To Prepare Paraeducators To Work In Center &Amp; Home Based Programs For Young Children With Disabilities From Birth To Age Five

Pickett, Anna Lou; Faison, Karen; Formanek, John; and Semrau, Barbara

Center for Advanced Study in Education, City University of New York, NY, 1999, second edition, 228 pp.

These instructional materials are designed to provide personnel developers and trainers with resources that can be used to improve the performance of paraeducators working in center-based and home visitor programs for young children with disabilities from birth to age 5. The modules cover: (1) roles of paraeducators working in inclusive environments for young children; (2) communication and team-building skills; (3) human and legal rights of children and youth with disabilities and their families; (4) human development; (5) the instructional process (individualized education and family services plans, assessment, data collection, goals and objectives, instructional interventions, and facilitating inclusion using developmentally appropriate activities); (6) working with families; (7) appreciating diversity; and (8) emergency, health, and safety procedures. The format for the instructional modules includes: instructional objectives, equipment and resources required, suggested training activities and exercises, background information for the trainer, and handouts and transparencies. Training procedures involve small group discussions, brainstorming, problem solving, case studies, and role plays. (References accompany each module.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED366142

A Core Curriculum &Amp; Training Program To Prepare Paraeducators To Work In Inclusive Classrooms Serving School Age Students With Disabilities

Pickett, Anna Lou; Faison, Karen; and Formanek, John

Center for Advanced Study in Education, City University of New York, NY, 1999, second edition, 210 pp.

These instructional materials are designed to improve the performance of paraeducators working with school-age students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms. The modules cover: (1) roles of paraeducators working in inclusive classrooms; (2) communication and team-building skills; (3) human and legal rights of children and youth with disabilities and their families; (4) human development; (5) the instructional process (individualized education plans, assessment, data collection, goals and objectives, instructional interventions, strategies for tutoring and reinforcing lessons, teaching reading, teaching arithmetic and mathematics, and teaching language arts); (6) appreciating diversity; and (7) emergency, health, and safety procedures. The format for the instructional modules includes: instructional objectives, equipment and resources required, suggested training activities and exercises, background information for the trainer, and handouts and transparencies. Training procedures involve small group discussions, brainstorming, problem solving, case studies, and role plays. (References accompany each module.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED366141

Core Curriculum To Prepare Paraprofessionals To Work With English Language Learners

1998

A Core Curriculum &Amp; Training Program To Prepare Paraeducators To Work In Transitional Services And Supported Employment Programs

Pickett, Anna Lou; Faison, Karen; Formanek, John; and Wood, James

Center for Advanced Study in Education, City University of New York, NY, 1999, second edition, 209 pp.

These instructional materials are designed to improve the performance of paraeducators working in transitional services and supported employment for teenagers and young adults with disabilities. The competency-based program helps participants to learn skills they can apply immediately, to accept new practices, and to increase their understanding of education issues. The modules cover: (1) roles of paraeducators working in transitional and vocational services; (2) communication and team-building skills; (3) human and legal rights of children and youth with disabilities and their families; (4) human development; (5) the instructional process (individualized education and transition plans, assessment, data collection, goals and objectives, and instructional interventions); (6) working with families; (7) appreciating diversity; and (8) emergency, health, and safety procedures. The format for the instructional modules includes: instructional objectives, equipment and resources required, suggested training activities and exercises, background information for the trainer, and handouts and transparencies. Training procedures involve small group discussions, brainstorming, problem solving, case studies, and role plays. (References accompany each module.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED366140

Enhancing Skills of Paraeducators: A Video-Assisted Program Second Edition

Robert L. Morgan, David E. Forbush, Deanna Avis

Available through TRI-SPED (Technology, Research, and Innovation in
Special Education, Utah State University, 6523 Old Main, Logan, UT
84322-6523. Toll-free at 1-877-722-3991. www.trisped.org

Now in its second edition, Enhancing Skills of Paraeducators (ESP 2) is a comprehensive, competency-based, field-tested curriculum for paraeducators and includes a 300-page manual, 73 video exercises (3 hours of video), 5 knowledge tests, and 10 school-based application (skill) exercises. After reading assignments, individuals or groups of trainees watch video exercises of school situations and discuss how to respond. Then, trainees carry out application assignments in school settings. Topics include communicating with students who have special needs, behavior intervention, behavior assessment, communicating with teachers and IEP Team members, using assertive communication, understanding issues faced by families and persons from other cultures or ethnic backgrounds, clarifying roles and responsibilities, paraeducator roles in the IEP, student assessment, and classroom management, assistive technology, record keeping, IDEA, Title I, Section 504, FERPA, ADA, ethical standards, professional conduct, and knowledge and skills required of paraeducators. Video material also includes interviews with a student who is blind, a student who is deaf, a student who uses a communication board, and three families who have a child with special needs. A facilitator's guide provides guidance, ideas, and resources for instructors. Six manuals, five videos, and the facilitator's guide are available for $395.

Expanding Traditional Roles In Vocational Work Experience Programs

A Course for Preparation of Paraeducators

Pat Haley, Chuck Steury, and Gail Westlin

CRDC Publications, Attn: V. Klum, PO Box 574, Portland, OR 97207; $25; 1993

Focuses on upgrading skills of paraeducators working with special needs students in vocational settings. The manual features: Nine broad competency training areas; over 30 relevant, motivating, field-tested activities; pages ready to be made into transparencies; suggested training schedule; bibliography of related services and materials.

Handbook For The Care Of Infants, Toddlers, And Young Children With Disabilities And Chronic Conditions

Karajicek, Marilyn; Steinke, Geraldine; Hertzberg, Dalice L.; Anastasiow, Nicholas; and Sandall, Susan, editors; 446 pp.; 1997

Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78757-6897; order no. 8376

Offered by the First Start Program to help early childhood personnel "to see the child before the disability." Faculty and consultants in child care, health, education, and early intervention describe chronic conditions and illnesses among children with disabilities. Organized into: Human Development, Chronic Conditions, Care Needs, and Communication and Community Support. Major conditions are explained, followed by descriptions of related special needs and guidance toward achieving best-practice recommendations for meeting them. Can also be used as a ready reference. Includes extensive bibliography and glossary.

The Hanen Program For Early Childhood Educators: Inservice Training For Child Care Providers On How To Facilitate Children's Social, Language, And Literacy Development

Weitzman, Elaine

Infant Toddler Intervention: The Transdisciplinary Journal; v4 n3 p173-202 Sep 1994

The Hanen Program for Early Childhood Educators provides caregivers in child care centers with on-site training in facilitating children's social, language, and literacy development. The program is conducted by a speech-language pathologist and consists of seven group training sessions and six individual videotaping sessions with feedback. A case study illustrates the program's effectiveness.

ERIC Accession Number: EJ491063

An Innovative Model For Training Orientation And Mobility Assistants

Wiener, W.R.

Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness; v87 n5 p134-37 May 1993

A model was developed to prepare specialists in orientation and mobility (O&M) who work with people with visual impairments, with the specialists in turn training and supervising O&M assistants. The project developed curriculum guidelines, training methods, a national workshop, and regional seminars.

ERIC Accession Number: EJ465475

Instructional Conversations: Understanding Through Discussion

The National Resource Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning, video with resource book

Bilingual Research Center, UCSC, Social Science II, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064; $40; (408) 459-3351

This video was taped in a Southern California public school where students were transitioning into mainstream English. The style depicted and promoted in this video is referenced as "Instructional Conversation (I.C.)." This approach is noted for the importance of construction of knowledge as opposed to direct transmission of information from a teacher to a student. I.C.âs are comprised of ten elements, five instructional and five conversational. These components are: 1) thematic focus, 2) activation and use of background knowledge and relevant schemata, 3) direct teaching, 4) promotion of more complex language and expression, 5) elicitation of bases for statements or positions, 6) using few "known-answer" questions, 7) response to student contributions, 8) connected discourse, 9) a challenging, but non-threatening atmosphere, and 10) general participation, including self-selected turns.

Instructional Leadership For The Rural Special Educator: Final Report

Hofmeister, Alan M.; and others

Utah State Univ., Logan. Center for Persons with Disabilities, 1996, 61 pp.

This project addressed the need for training materials for paraeducators in their roles as members of the instructional team, and for teachers as classroom executives who lead that team. Paraprofessional personnel in this project include paid aides, volunteers, cross-age tutors, and parents instructing children in the schools. The three objectives of the project were: (1) training in effective teaching/instruction; (2) training for paraprofessionals; and (3) the executive functions of teaching. Formative and summative field tests in rural sites were conducted to ensure that effective, generalizable, and replicable training programs had been developed that were competency-based and field-based, and feasible within budget constraints. The project training materials and programs were designed to be easily exportable to district level, school sites, or individual classrooms. The materials, training activities and participants, facilitators, dissemination, and methodological issues are discussed in terms of project objectives. While the first year of the project was largely devoted to the development of materials, the subsequent 3 years saw training of 4,630 paraprofessionals and teachers. In addition to direct training of teachers and paraprofessionals, conferences and presentations were often attended by supervisors, state and district level administrators, and university personnel. Study data are included in tables. Appendices include Gantt Charts for the years of the study and sample forms from the training programs.

ERIC Accession Number: ED401264

Instructional Strategies For Crosscultural Students With Special Education Needs

Training Manual

A BETTER EDUCATION FOR A CHANGING POPULATION

Video Tape

Resources in Special Education, 650 Howe Av., Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 95825

The training manual is divided into three sections: a) understanding cross-cultural issues for the appropriate placement of culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional students in special education, b) instructional issues, and c) instructional strategies for use with the core curriculum in the special education classroom. The video tape covers use of alternative instructional techniques and student study teams for exceptional students from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

The Medically Fragile Child In The School Setting

A Resource Guide for the Educational Team

American Federation of Teachers; 34 pp. plus appendices; 1992

AFT, 555 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001; item #451; $1.50 for members, $5.00 for non-members

Produced by the AFT's Ad Hoc Committee on Health Care Responsibilities in Special Education. Contains research on medically fragile children in schools. Designed to educate AFT members on their roles and responsibilities with students and their rights as employees. It outlines possible solutions and protections for local unions to pursue on behalf of their members.

Missouri-Tikes: Training Individuals To Care For Exceptional Children Outreach Project

Final Report

Busch, Robert F.

Missouri Univ., Columbia, 1996, 82 pp.

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the M-TIKES (Missouri-Training Individuals to Care for Exceptional Students) Outreach Project, which used a "train-the-trainer" model to increase the number of child care providers trained to integrate children with and without disabilities. The project's major objectives were to provide child caregivers with information needed to mainstream children with disabilities into child care settings and to increase child caregivers' knowledge about child development and appropriate adaptations for children with disabilities. The project's curriculum consists of an inservice training component and an on-site collaboration and consultation component. A nine-part videotape series was also developed. The project resulted in the training of 265 child caregivers, an increase in the number of childcare facilities accepting preschool children with disabilities, a replicable inservice training model, and curriculum materials. Individual sections of the report cover the following aspects of the project: goals, philosophy, description of model and participants, research, method, measures, results, and impact. Appendices include a description of each videotape, the needs assessment form, a sample training agenda, a listing of sites and facilitators trained, an inservice evaluation scale, and a form for observing caregiver behavior. (Contains 23 references.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED392220

Multicultural Perspectives In The Classroom: Professional Preparation For Educational Paraprofessionals

Harper, Victoria

Action in Teacher Education; v16 n3 p66-78 Fall 1994

Theme issue title: "Celebrating Diversity in Teacher Education"

Available from UMI

Paraprofessionals often represent the closest linking of language and culture between communities and schools, taking the lead in teaching second-language learners. Their lack of professional education can create situations where the neediest children are served by the least prepared adults. The article suggests a professional career ladder for paraprofessionals.

ERIC Accession Number: EJ498432

North Dakota's Rural Training Projects: Past, Present And Future

Vassiliou, Demetrios; Johnson, Dave

In: Reaching to the Future: Boldly Facing Challenges in Rural Communities. Conference Proceedings of the American Council on Rural Special Education (ACRES) (Las Vegas, Nevada, March 15-18, 1995); see RC 020 016, 9 pp., 1995

This paper describes the North Dakota Statewide Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities Facility Staff Training Program. For the past 10 years, the training program, in association with Minot State University, has been available to agencies and their employees who provide services to individuals with developmental disabilities in rural areas. Full-time direct service staff are required to demonstrate knowledge and skills in topic areas addressed in 14 training modules. These skills are taught at provider sites by certified regional trainers. In addition to entry level certification, the program offers advanced certification, an associate of arts degree in developmental disabilities, a bachelor of science degree in mental retardation (non-teaching), and a master of science degree in special education. In October 1992, the North Dakota Center for Disabilities (NDCD) expanded the program to address the increasing demand for paraeducators, particularly in rural areas. In the project's first year, four pilot sites were selected and curriculum development was initiated. The second year saw an additional 14 special education units brought into the program, with the remaining 13 units joining in the third year. Areas of training were developed according to the surveyed needs of program participants and consist of initial and advanced levels of certification. Training modules can be presented through large group instruction, small group format, on-the-job demonstrations, or self-instruction. Participant competencies are evaluated through pretests/posttests that accompany each training module. As federal funding ends, the NDCD has been actively seeking ways to preserve the program.

Orientation Level Training For Paraeducators In Lifting, Transferring And Positioning (1999)
Orientation Level Training For Paraeducators Working With Students With Special Health Care Needs (1998)
Orientation Level Training For School Employees Who Administer Oral Medications To Students (1999)


Paraeducator Project, Washington Education Association

Washington Education Association, 33434 8th Avenue, Federal Way, WA 98003

Manuals are intended as a resource for paraeducators upon completion of the Orientation Level Training, not a substitute for specific training or for delegation and supervision. Describes population served and step-by-step procedures and scenarios for meeting their needs. Includes illustrations and representative documents.

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Paraeducators: Lifelines In The Classroom

Melding: Training Module for Partner Teachers who Supervise Special Education Paraeducators

Mary W. Lasater, Ed.D., Marlene M. Johnson, Ed.D., Mary M. Fitzgerald, M.Ed., LR Consulting, POB 6049-747, Katy, TX 77491-6049

http://www.lrconsulting.com

LifeLines is a comprehensive series of six trainng modules developed to prepare pre-service and in-service paraeducators during staff development and mentoring opportunities. The modules incorporate experimential learning activities, as well as left and right brain activities to ensure that the needs of a variety of adult learners will be met. Each user-friendly module includes activity notes, overhead and handout masters, and resource section. ParaEducators: LifeLines in the Classroom includes six modules:

  • Module 1: Defining the Role of the Paraeducator
  • Module 2: Celebrating Similarities: Students with Disabilities
  • Module 3: The IEP Process: The Role of the Paraeducator
  • Module 4: Supporting the Instructional Process
  • Module 5: Behavior Improvement Strategies
  • Module 6: Least Restrictive Environment and the Role of the Paraeducator

Access http://www.lrconsulting.com/LifeLines_Overview.html to learn more about specific objectives covered in each of the modules. For a review of LifeLines, see Teacher Education and Special Education, v21, n2, 150-153, 1998.

Price $825 per set of modules or $150 for individual modules.

Melding, a training module for partner teachers on how to mentor and coach paraeducators is also written in the same format as lifelines and parallels the module series. Price: $150 for the module.

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A Paraprofessional's Handbook

Working with Students Who are Visually Impaired

Cyral Miller and Nancy Levack, Editors, Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 176 pp., 1997.

Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Business Office, 1100 West 45th Street, Austin, Texas 78756-3494

Designed to help vision teachers and paraprofessionals share basic information needed to work with students who are visually impaired. Also for wider community of regular teachers, school support staff, parents, and community members, Chapters can be used as needed to support short inservice sessions. Sections: Overview (role of paraprofessionals and explanation of visual impairments), Social Skills, Daily Living Skills, Orientation and Mobility Skills, Technology, Adaptation, Students with Multiple Impairments, and an Appendix.

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Paraprofessionals: The Bridge To Successful Full Inclusion

Wadsworth, Donna E.; Knight, Diane

Intervention in School and Clinic; v31 n3 p166-71 Jan 1996

Available from UMI

This article offers six training suggestions for preparing paraprofessionals to work successfully with students having disabilities in an inclusive setting. These include providing preservice training through a centralized interdisciplinary training team, modeling the use of appropriate behavior management techniques, and communicating the importance of team collaboration.

ERIC Accession Number: EJ516186

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Piecing Together The Paraprofessional Puzzle

Handbook

Carol Long

Instructional Media Laboratory, University of Missouri-Columbia, 2316 Industrial Drive, Columbia, MO 65202 or call 1-800-669-2465; $9.00

Provides framework for orientation and training of paraprofessional in his/her initial year of employment. The goals are to facilitate the transition from novice to experienced paraprofessional by explaining various roles and functions of job, develop a district or building job description for paraprofessional, clarify concept of confidentiality, understand the special education process and the procedures used by district to evaluate and diagnose students, and know the different methods for observing and recording behavior.

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Positive Behavior Strategies For Paraprofessionals

Module Four. Facilitator's Edition [and] Student's Edition. Strategies for Paraprofessionals Who Support Individuals with Disabilities Series

Hewitt, Amy; Langenfeld, Karen

Hutchinson Technical Coll., MN; Minnesota State Board of Technical Colleges, St. Paul; Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Institute on Community Integration, 1995, 217 pp.

University of Minnesota, The Institute on Community Integration (UAP), 150 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($25 facilitator edition; $15 student edition)

The fourth in a series of federally supported modules for training paraprofessional school personnel who work with students with disabilities, this module presents principles and techniques of behavior management. Both a facilitator's edition and a student's edition are provided. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of behavior and the role of the consequences and antecedents in the environment. Chapter 2 offers guidelines on creating positive learning experiences. It also discusses development of a positive reinforcement plan and common questions about reinforcement techniques. An overview of challenging behavior is given in Chapter 3. The cost-benefit analysis of changing behavior and the three-factor theory are discussed. Chapter 4 focuses on alternatives to challenging behaviors, including overcoming avoidance. Chapter 5 gives guidance on using behavioral interventions with students and what to do in an emergency. An appendix defines and explains the appropriate use of controlled or regulated procedures (such as use of restraints, or temporary delay of meals or water) under Minnesota Law. The facilitator's edition offers learning activities and information sheets to be used as transparencies. (Contains 52 references.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED398697

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Preparing Para-Professoional Early Interventionists (PPEI)

Manual and videotape

Samuel Baird

Communication Skill Builders, P.O. Box 42050-Cs4, Tucson, Arizona 84733 or call (602) 323-7500; $79

Curriculum developed to help professional early interventionists provide training for paraprofessionals so that they will become valued and respected contributors to early intervention team. Addresses basic and generic early intervention issues. Used to prepare paraprofessionals to extend the impact of professional early interventionists and to assist with implementing IFSPâs that provide family support, child development, and infant-parent services.

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Profile Of Effective Teaching In A Multilingual Classroom

The National Resource Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning, video with resource book

Bilingual Research Center, UCSC, Social Science II, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064; $40; (408) 459-3351

The video starts with the acquisition of language skills through math. Students with various language and cultural backgrounds (chronological grade approximately middle school) can easily work mathematical equations as numbers are a universal language. Students are taught to grammatically pronounce numbers and to read math problems. Additionally, they are taught to use Venn diagrams as a way of collecting data for comparison and contrast reports. By integrating math with language skills, each student is afforded the opportunity to build a vocabulary as well as develop their problem-solving skills. Instructors are encouraged to speak slowly, use visual demonstrations, and provide gestures wherever possible. Learning strategies are modeled in every subject matter. Teachers emphasize the importance of reading the text headings, look at graphics and pictures, and skim bold printed material. Instructors are encouraged to engage in thematic learning while continuously drawing upon the students cultural heritage.

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Providing Cross-Cultural Support Services To Individuals With Disabilities And Their Families

Module Two. Facilitator's Edition [and] Student's Edition. Strategies for Paraprofessionals Who Support Individuals with Disabilities Series

Slobof, Jenelle; and others

Hutchinson Technical Coll., MN.; Minnesota State Board of Technical Colleges, St. Paul.; Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Inst. on Community Integration, 1996, 265 pp.

University of Minnesota, The Institute on Community Integration (UAP), 150 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($25 facilitator edition; $15 student edition)

This module presents information for training paraprofessional school staff on providing cross-cultural support services to individuals with disabilities and their families. Both a facilitator's edition and a student's edition are provided. Chapter 1 offers an introduction to diversity and direct service and includes sections on terminology and cultural competence. Chapter 2 discusses self-identification and ways to learn about other cultures. Chapter 3 provides information on institutional cultural competence, including institutional and media bias. Individual cultural competence is discussed in chapter 4. Chapter 5 looks at similarities and differences between cultures. Using culturally sensitive and inclusive language is reviewed in chapter 6. Chapter 7 gives tips on being a culturally competent paraprofessional. Chapter 8 reviews previous information. The facilitator's edition offers learning activities and information sheets to be used as transparencies. A glossary of terms and a resource list of videotapes, books, journal articles, newsletters, and other publications are appended. (Contains 17 references.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED398695

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The Teacher As An Executive

A Training Program for the Teacher as Leader of the Instructional Team

Betty Ashbaker and Jill Morgan

Center for Persons with Disabilities, 6800 Old Main Hill, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-6800; phone 435-797-7001 or fax 435-797-9444; $40 plus shipping and handling

Designed to enhance the skills of the teacher as leader of the classroom instructional team. Contains chapters on: 1) the importance of effective instructional programs, including steps that can be taken to rectify the shortcomings in curricular materials; 2) teamwork, which clarifies roles and establishes expectations and examines communication styles and their impact on teamwork; 3) self-evaluation through observation, which introduces a simple yet effective classroom observation procedure for identifying and meeting the professional development needs of both teacher and paraeducator; 4) post-observation conferencing, which completes the observation procedure by providing a problem-solving approach to understanding classroom situations; and 5) training, addressing the questions of how to determine training needs, methods of delivery, and the assessment of effectiveness of training. It is in workbook format and can be used by a teacher working independently or as a participantâs manual in a group delivery format. Accompanying video contains clips of teachers and paraeducators at work and is used for illustration and evaluation purposes and for completion of assignments.

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Teamwork And Evaluation For Teachers And Paraeducators

Betty Ashbaker and Jill Morgan

Center for Persons with Disabilities, 6800 Old Main Hill, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-6800; phone 435-797-7001 or fax 435-797-9444; $40 plus shipping and handling

These materials allow teachers and paraeducators to examine their current teamwork and self-evaluation practices and set goals for changes in order to increase their effectiveness as an instructional team. Central feature is use of observation data as a tool for self-evaluation÷not as a threatening process. With the help of a colleague who collects data without passing judgment÷but who is then available to discuss the data÷they can evaluate their own performances and make improvements. Chapters cover: clarifying and understanding roles, more effective communication, collaboration, collecting observational data, self-evaluation for improvement of practice, and team conferencing. There are also review chapters on the basics of effective instruction and behavior management. Teamwork and Evaluation is in binder format and is designed as a workbook, facilitating planning both individually and as a team.

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A Training Program Designed To Develop Knowledgeable Paraprofessionals With Improved Job Performance Skills To Meet The Needs Of Teachers And Special Education Students

Davis, Julie H.

M.S. Final Report, Nova Southeastern University, 1995, 81 pp.

The paper reports on a practicum project to assess the training needs of paraprofessionals and to develop a training program to meet those needs. The first section of the paper is a literature review, which revealed few studies that have addressed the efficacy of paraprofessionals, though research that has been done indicates that paraprofessionals working with handicapped children have a direct effect on the students' academic performance. The literature also reveals that few states systematically train or certify paraprofessionals, and few universities teach preservice teachers how to utilize paraprofessionals in the classroom. The training program was designed to help improve the knowledge of disabilities, working relationships, and job performance skills of a target group of 12 special education paraprofessionals who work with K-2 students with handicaps in a rural Maine island school. Twenty-five skills were identified as those a paraprofessional should possess for job success; a needs assessment survey was administered to participants. Overall, entry skills and knowledge of the target group assessed ranged from 20 percent to 60 percent level of proficiency, well below the 80 percent or above level of proficiency preferred in the literature and among professionals surveyed for the study. The objectives for the program were for the paraprofessionals to increase their knowledge of disabilities, working relationships, and job performance skills by a program objective of 80 percent. The target group participated in a 12-week training session developed from a needs analysis assessment. Each of the weekly work sessions is described in the report. Project evaluations and assessments indicated that all program objectives were met, with the target group improving dramatically in all areas. Recommendations for staff development budget and expenditures, plus topics to be covered are outlined. Ten appendices provide: Maine Department of Education Special Education Regulations; Needs Assessment; Summary of Needs Assessment; Pretest for Paraprofessionals; Posttest for Paraprofessionals; Results of Pre-Assessment for Paraprofessionals; Summary of Results of Pre/Post Evaluations; Pre/Post Professional Evaluation of Paraprofessionals; Paraprofessional Training Evaluation; and Paraprofessional Certificate of Participation. (Contains 40 references.)

ERIC Accession Number: ED386430

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Sourcebook For Teaching Assistants In Early Childhood

Shelton, Gen, Editor; Indiana Preschool Initiative, Center for Innovative Practices for young Children, Institute for the Study of Developmental Disabilities; Foreword by Anna Lou Pickett, Director, National Resource Center for Paraprofessionals in Education and Related Services; 274 pp.; 1996

Center for Disability Information and Referral (CeDIR), Institute for the Study of Developmental Disabilities, The University Affiliated Program of Indiana, Indiana University-Bloomington, 2853 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN 47408-2601; telephone 812-855-6509; e-mail <uap@isdd.isdd.indiana.edu>

Directed to Teaching Assistants and the teachers who work with them. Also useful to policymakers and personnel developers. Helps paraprofessionals and teachers how to define role as a team member, recognize the characteristics of a quality early childhood program, and use child development information to assist in the teaching process. Designed to be read over the course of a semester with time devoted to discussing a chapter weekly to enhance communication between adults in the classroom. Contains practical and theoretical knowledge. Sections: I) The Team--Staff and Families; II) The Program--Quality characteristics and Confidentiality; III) The Children--Growing and Learning; and IV) Appendices on disabilities, resources, and a glossary.

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WHAT DO I DO NOW?

Communication Skills and Strategies for Individuals Working with Children who Have Sensory Impairment (for children 3-8 years)

24 videotapes plus workbooks, $250

Hope Inc., 55 East 100 North, Suite 203, Logan, Utah 84321

435-752-9533; e-mail <hope@hopepubl.com>; web site <www.hopepubl.com>

These 24 videotapes are especially for paraeducators, teacher aides, and teachers and feature skills and strategies for communicating effectively with young children who are sensory impaired. Topics include recognizing and responding to communication signals, building communication into daily routines, interactive turn-taking, active vs. passive communication, choice-making, avoiding communication stress, using calendar systems, motivating the child to communicate, encouraging peer interaction, using comments and questions, and play that encourages communication. Each video has an accompanying workbook and a laminated card with lesson tips.

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Working With Individuals Who Are Medically Fragile Or Have Physical Disabilities

Module Six. Facilitator's Edition [and] Student's Edition

Strategies for Paraprofessionals Who Support Individuals with Disabilities Series

Ness, Jean E.

Hutchinson Technical Coll., MN.; Minnesota State Board of Technical Colleges, St. Paul.; Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Inst. on Community Integration, 1995; 597 pp.

University of Minnesota, The Institute on Community Integration (UAP), 150 Pillsbury Drive, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 ($25 facilitator edition; $15 student edition)

The sixth in a series of federally supported modules for training paraprofessional school personnel who work with students with disabilities, this module presents information on working with individuals who are medically fragile or have physical disabilities. Both a facilitator's edition and a student's edition are provided. Chapter 1 examines the changing roles of education related to students with disabilities. Chapter 2 investigates national demographics related to disabilities. Inclusive language is discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 provides information on disability-related laws and abuse and neglect laws. The role of the school nurse and health paraprofessional are addressed in Chapter 5. Communication strategies and problem-solving techniques are described in Chapter 6. Chapter 7 provides information on teamwork. Chapter 8 discusses caring for individuals with different disabilities. Specific instructions for 10 different health procedures and general instructions for 7 others are provided in Chapters 9 and 10. Chapter 11 presents material on properly administering medication at school. Nineteen appendices provide extensive supplementary material, forms, and articles. The facilitator's edition offers learning activities and information sheets to be used as transparencies. (Contains 46 references.)

ACCESSION NUMBER: ED398699

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A WORKSHOP FOR CLASSROOM ASSISTANTS

Harrison, Barbara

Montessori Life; v6 n4 p26-27, Fall 1994

Theme Issue: "Spotlight: Public Schools."

Describes organizing and conducting workshops for adult teaching assistants in a Montessori public school setting. Includes contact information for obtaining similar workshop kits, with outlines, handouts, projects, and forms.

ERIC Accession Number: EJ499951

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The Young Adult Institute Video Series

Young Adult Institute

The Young Adult Institute, 460 W. 34th St., 11th floor, New York, NY 10001; or fax to (212) 629-4113; $95 for all videos except AIDS video which is $145

Titles include: Working with Families: What Professionals Need to Know, Clients Rights are Human Rights, Strategies for Changing Behavior: A Positive Approach, AIDS: Training People with Developmental Disabilities to Better Protect Themselves

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